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Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers 2017

17 May 2017

ISSN: 2207-5917 (Online)
ISSN: 2207-5909 (Print)

With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, TEQSA’s logo, any material protected by a trade mark and where otherwise noted, all material presented in this document is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence.

The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website (accessible using the link provided) as is the full legal code for the CC BY 3.0 AU licence.

The document must be attributed: Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers – May 2017.

Contacts
More information about the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, including electronic versions of this report.

Comments and enquiries about this report may be directed to:

Communications Manager
Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
Level 14/530 Collins Street
MELBOURNE VIC 3001
T: 1300 739 585
F: 1300 739 586
E: collections [at] teqsa.gov.au

Introduction

Background

The Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers (‘the Statistics Report’) is the fourth release of selected higher education sector data held by TEQSA for its quality assurance activities. It provides a snapshot of national statistics from across the sector, bringing together data collected directly by TEQSA and data sourced from the main higher education statistics collections managed by the Australian Government Department of Education and Training. This includes data from TEQSA’s National Register of Higher Education Providers and annual Provider information Request (PIR). The PIR gathers a limited set of key data from some providers not required to report, or only partially report, data in the Department of Education and Training’s Higher Education Information Management System (HEIMS).

Information outlined in the Statistics Report highlights the diversity of the Australian higher education sector. For descriptive observations about the range and type of registered providers in the sector, readers may also be interested in the TEQSA paper, A risk and standards based approach to quality assurance in Australia’s diverse higher education sector.

About the report

The Statistics Report provides high-level information across four key areas: providers, students, academic staff and finance. This update of the Statistics Report focuses on data relating to 2015. Where available, data relating to 2013 and 2014 has been included to enable trend reporting. While the Statistics Report is focused on higher education data, financial data includes all sources of revenue within a provider’s operations, including revenue from VET and other activities, reflecting the breadth and diversity of operations within some higher education providers. The Explanatory Notes and Glossary at the back of the Statistics Report provide further contextual information on the data and presentation.

Provider categories

There are a number of ways that higher education data can be presented to reflect different groupings of providers in the sector. This includes categorising providers according to different funding and legislative arrangements, or according to different data reporting requirements and collection mechanisms, or to reflect clusters of providers with similar characteristics or selected attributes.

For the purposes of this report, TEQSA has used the broad categories ‘Universities’, ‘Non-University For-Profit’ (For-Profit), ‘Non-University Not for-Profit’ (Not-for-Profit) and ‘Technical and Further Education’ (TAFE). Previous editions of the report used the categories ‘Universities’, ‘Non-University Higher Education Providers (FEE-HELP)’ [NUHEPs (FEE-HELP)] and ‘Non-University Higher Education Providers (Other)’ [NUHEPs (Other)]. The change of provider categories allows for the alignment with categories reported in TEQSA’s Key Financial Metrics on Australian’s Higher Education Sector report. The consultation on the Key Financial Metrics on Australian’s Higher Education Sector report supported the proposed provider categories.

Data

The data within this edition of the Statistics Report relates to 2015, the most recent year for which comprehensive, comparable data is available. For the first time, TEQSA has been able to provide a three-year comparison of provider, student, staff and financial data. Data across years may differ marginally to that in Statistics Reports released previously due to a small number of institutions revising data since the release of previous Statistics Reports. Financial data in this report relates to providers’ most recently available financial reporting year as at the time of the 2016 collection. The relevant financial reporting years in the collection are those ended 31 December 2015 to 30 June 2016.

Enquiries

For enquiries relating to this report and PIR data please contact TEQSA’s Information Management team at collections [at] teqsa.gov.au. For enquiries relating to HEIMS data please contact the Department of Education and Training’s University Statistics Team at University-Statistics [at] education.gov.au.

The National Register

The National Register is an important source of information, providing updated information about the status of registered providers and TEQSA-accredited courses.

Higher education at a glance

Higher Education at a Glance infographic

Higher education at a glance infographic notes

  1. TEQSA National Register; 2016 PIR; Finance Publication; Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training. 
  2. A small number of providers were not required to submit student, academic staff and/or finance data to the TEQSA PIR due to context such as being a recently registered higher education provider, in the process of merging with another entity, in the final stages of teaching out courses (and withdrawing registration), or ceased to be registered with TEQSA at the time of collecting 2015 data (i.e. in 2016). 
  3. Includes students with a citizenship classified as ‘unknown’ or ‘unspecified’. 
  4. Excludes staff with duties unspecified or duties classified as ‘unknown’. Apart from the University of Divinity, data also excludes academic staff that teach higher education courses through a third party arrangement.
  5. Financial year relates to a provider’s most recently available reporting year as at the time of the 2016 collection. The relevant reporting years in the collection include those ended 31 December 2015 to 30 June 2016. This refers to the 2016 collection year. 
  6. Data derived from the broad field of education of the course, rather than the broad field of education of the unit studied.
  7. Includes Bachelor Honours students.

Providers[1]

Provider data in this section relates to providers registered with TEQSA for all or part of 2015.

Table 1: Providers by State, 2015[2]

State

Universities

For-Profit

Not-for-Profit

TAFEs

Total

%

NSW

11

30

26

1

68

39%

ViC

9

16

17

5

47

27%

WA

5

6

5

3

19

11%

SA

6

5

6

1

18

10%

QLD

8

6

1

1

16

9%

ACT

2

0

0

1

3

2%

TAS

1

0

2

0

3

2%

NT

1

0

1

0

2

1%

Total

43

63

58

12

176

100%

 

 

In 2015, 91% of students (headcount) were enrolled with universities, despite the other providers making up 76% of all higher education providers in Australia.

 

Table 2: Providers by Self-Accrediting Authority (SAA) and TEQSA Registration Category, 2015[3]

 

SAA

Non-SAA

Total

%

Higher Education Provider

10

123

133

76%

Australian University

40

0

40

23%

Australian University of Specialisation

1

0

1

1%

Overseas University

2

0

2

1%

Total

53

123

176

100%

 

In addition to universities, ten non-university providers had partial or full self-accrediting authority in 2015 (including four non-university providers who were granted full or partial self-accrediting authority during 2015).

 

Figure 1: Providers by Size of Student Load (EFTSL), 2015[4] [5]

Figure 1:	Providers by Size of Student Load (EFTSL), 2015

Australian higher education providers are diverse in size. 52% of providers had fewer than 500 EFTSL in 2015, and nearly a quarter had greater than or equal to 5,000 EFTSL.

 

Figure 2: Providers by Dual Sector Status, 2015[6]

Figure 2:	Providers by Dual Sector Status, 2015

 

Figure 3: CRICOS-registered providers, 2015[7]

Figure 3:	CRiCOS-registered providers, 2015

 

Table 3: New courses (TEQSA-accredited) by AQF Level, 2013 – 2015[8]

 

AQF

 

Course Level

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

2013 – 2015

Total

% change between 2013 and

2015

5

Diploma

26

14

33

73

27%

 

6

Advanced Diploma

Associate Degree

 

33

 

8

 

15

 

56

 

-55%

7

Bachelor Degree

54

41

26

121

-52%

 

 

8

Bachelor Honours Graduate Certificate

Graduate Diploma

 

 

26

 

 

40

 

 

24

 

 

90

 

 

-8%

 

9

Masters by Coursework

Masters by Research

 

19

 

24

 

16

 

59

 

-16%

 

10

Doctorate by Coursework

Doctorate by Research

 

0

 

2

 

3

 

5

 

-

Total

 

158

129

117

404

-26%

The number of new course accreditations has declined over time. New courses make up 60% of the registered courses in 2015.

 

Table 4: New courses (TEQSA-accredited) by Broad Field of Education, 2013 – 2015[9]

 

 

Broad Field of Education

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

2013 – 2015

Total

% change between 2013 and

2015

Natural and Physical Sciences

1

1

3

5

200%

information Technology

5

7

2

14

-60%

Engineering and Related Technologies

7

2

3

12

-57%

Architecture and Building

2

1

1

4

-50%

Agriculture, Environmental and Related Studies

0

1

0

1

-

Health

16

11

8

35

-50%

Education

6

16

4

26

-33%

Management and Commerce

59

39

60

158

2%

Society and Culture

23

30

22

75

-4%

Creative Arts

39

21

14

74

-64%

Food, Hospitality and Personal Services

0

0

0

0

-

Mixed Field Programs

0

0

0

0

-

Total

158

129

117

404

-26%

Students[10] [11] [12]

Table 5: Total Students by Provider Category, 2013 – 2015

 

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

% change between 2013 and 2015

 

EFTSL

887,471

918,533

937,277

6%

Universities

Headcount

1,234,210

1,283,508

1,310,226

6%

 

Number of Providers

42

43

43

-

 

EFTSL

37,090

44,721

49,961

35%

For-Profit

Headcount

57,589

67,840

76,740

33%

 

Number of Providers

56

56

59

-

 

EFTSL

18,077

18,759

21,199

17%

Not-for-Profit

Headcount

35,177

36,503

42,011

19%

 

Number of Providers

53

55

53

-

 

EFTSL

3,791

4,114

4,566

20%

TAFEs

Headcount

5,713

5,570

6,059

6%

 

Number of Providers

11

10

12

-

The number of students enrolled in Australian higher education providers has been growing over the past three years. Over 1.4 million students were studying Australian higher education courses in 2015.

 

Figure 4: Student Proportion by Provider Category, 2013-2015

Figure 4:	Student Proportion by Provider Category, 2013-2015

While universities continue to have the largest proportion of students enrolled, the proportion of students enrolled at the other provider types has been progressively increasing.

 

Table 6: Students (EFTSL) by Citizenship, Onshore and Offshore, 2013 – 2015[13] [14]

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

% change from 2013 and

 

 

 

2015

 

Domestic

662,667

685,354

694,631

5%

 

Overseas Onshore

166,922

176,563

187,584

12%

Universities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overseas Offshore

57,882

56,616

55,062

-5%

 

Total

887,471

918,533

937,277

6%

 

Domestic

17,883

20,491

22,557

26%

 

For-Profit

Overseas Onshore

                                                                                                                                                                                               

16,967

20,850

24,121

42%

 

Overseas Offshore

1,968

3,052

3,075

56%

 

Total

36,819

44,393

49,753

35%

 

Domestic

14,682

14,850

15,787

8%

 

Overseas Onshore

2,807

3,293

4,105

46%

Not-for-Profit

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overseas Offshore

259

278

895

245%

 

Total

17,748

18,421

20,786

17%

 

Domestic

2,531

2,583

2,742

8%

TAFEs

Overseas Onshore

1,260

1,530

1,824

45%

 

Total

3,791

4,113

4,566

21%

 

Domestic

697,763

723,278

735,717

5%

 

Overseas Onshore

187,956

202,236

217,634

16%

Sector

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overseas Offshore

60,109

59,946

59,032

-2%

In 2015, 26% of all providers delivered higher education offshore (43), the majority being universities (31). The largest growth in offshore delivery was made by Not-for-Profit providers.

 

Table 7: Domestic and Overseas Students (EFTSL), 2013 – 2015[15] [16]

 

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

% change between 2013

and 2015

 

Domestic

662,667

685,354

694,631

5%

Universities

Overseas

224,804

233,179

242,646

8%

 

Total

887,471

918,533

937,277

6%

 

Domestic

17,883

20,491

22,557

26%

For-Profit

Overseas

18,936

23,902

27,197

44%

 

Total

36,819

44,393

49,753

35%

 

Domestic

14,682

14,850

15,787

8%

Not-for-Profit

Overseas

3,066

3,571

5,000

63%

 

Total

17,748

18,421

20,786

17%

 

Domestic

2,531

2,583

2,742

8%

TAFEs

Overseas

1,260

1,530

1,824

45%

 

Total

3,791

4,114

4,566

20%

 

Sector Total

945,828

985,461

1,012,383

7%

The overseas student EFTSL has continued to grow over time. There was a 40% increase in the number of overseas students studying at Not-for-Profit providers in 2015 from the previous year.

 

Figure 5: Domestic and Overseas Students (EFTSL) by BFoE, 2015[17] [18]

Figure 5:	Domestic and Overseas Students (EFTSL) by BFoE, 2015

 

Table 8: Students (EFTSL) by Aggregated Course Level, 2013 – 2015[19] [20]

 

2013

2014

2015

% change between 2013 and 2015

Undergraduate

680,412

692,379

703,956

3%

Postgraduate

187,886

203,878

211,955

13%

Universities

Other

19,173

22,276

21,366

11%

Total

887,471

918,533

937,277

6%

Undergraduate

30,770

34,501

36,602

19%

Postgraduate

6,105

10,069

13,248

117%

For-Profit

Other

214

151

111

-48%

Total

37,090

44,721

49,961

35%

Undergraduate

9,689

10,278

12,006

24%

Postgraduate

8,314

8,417

9,129

10%

Not-for-Profit

Other

74

64

65

-12%

Total

18,077

18,759

21,199

17%

Undergraduate

3,788

4,090

4,536

20%

Postgraduate

<5

24

30

-

TAFEs

Other

<5

<5

<5

-

Total

3,791

4,114

4,566

20%

Sector Total

946,429

986,126

1,013,004

7%

The biggest increase in students (EFTSL) in 2015 was at the undergraduate level.

 

Figure 6: Students (EFTSL) by BFoE and Aggregated Course Level, 2015[21] [22]

Figure 6:	Students (EFTSL) by BFoE and Aggregated Course Level, 2015

 

Table 9: Commencing Students (EFTSL), 2013 – 2015

 

2013

2014

2015

 

EFTSL

% change from 2012

EFTSL

% change from 2013

EFTSL

% change from 2014

Universities

350,196

4%

366,648

5%

363,561

-1%

For-Profit

21,731

29%

26,236

21%

28,237

8%

Not-for-Profit

8,877

-2%

10,068

13%

11,775

17%

TAFEs

1,866

-12%

1,831

-2%

2,168

18%

Total

382,671

5%

404,783

6%

405,742

0%

In 2015, the number of commencing student EFTSL for Universities declined. This was caused by a drop in domestic postgraduate commencements.

 

Figure 7: Completing Students (headcount), 2013 – 2015

Figure 7:	Completing Students (headcount), 2013 – 2015

 

Figure 8: Undergraduate Commencing Students (EFTSL) by Basis for Admission, 2015[23]

Figure 8:	Undergraduate Commencing Students (EFTSL) by Basis for Admission, 2015

The number of students entering a higher education provider through ‘mature age entry’ decreased by 9% from 2014. The ‘other basis’ admission type increased by 7% from 2014.

 

Figure 9: Students (EFTSL) by Mode of Attendance, 2015[24] [25]

Figure 9:	Students (EFTSL) by Mode of Attendance, 2015

Eighty-seven percent of students studying at a higher education provider were studying internally (i.e. face-to-face) in 2015.

From 2014 there was a 37% increase in the number of students studying via a flexible delivery mode. The internal and external modes of attendance saw modest increases of 2% and 6% respectively.

 

Table 10: Students (headcount) by Type of Attendance, 2013 – 2015[26]

 

 

2013

2014

2015

% change between 2013 and 2015

 

Full-time

873,714

912,423

933,225

7%

Universities

Part-time

360,496

371,085

377,001

5%

 

Total

1,234,210

1,283,508

1,310,226

6%

 

Full-time

38,107

47,941

55,033

44%

For-Profit

Part-time

19,496

19,908

21,716

11%

 

Total

57,603

67,849

76,749

33%

 

Full-time

13,580

14,401

16,280

20%

Not-for-Profit

Part-time

21,599

22,102

25,746

19%

 

Total

35,179

36,503

42,026

19%

 

Full-time

4,136

4,215

4,660

13%

TAFEs

Part-time

1,577

1,355

1,399

-11%

 

Total

5,713

5,570

6,059

6%

 

Sector Total

1,332,705

1,393,430

1,435,060

8%

Academic staff[27] [28] [29] [30]

Table 11: Academic Staff (FTE) by Work Contract, 2013 – 2015

 

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

% of total in 2015

 

% change between 2013

and 2015

 

Full-Time

37,426

37,983

37,823

67%

1%

Universities

Fractional Full-Time

5,676

5,934

6,018

10%

6%

 

Casual

11,366

12,078

12,919

23%

14%

 

Total

54,468

55,996

56,761

-

4%

 

Full-Time

491

542

602

31%

23%

For-Profit

Fractional Full-Time

163

212

263

13%

61%

 

Casual

942

781

1,097

56%

16%

 

Total

1,597

1,535

1,962

-

23%

 

Full-Time

451

472

488

48%

8%

Not-for-Profit

Fractional Full-Time

138

124

130

13%

-6%

 

Casual

265

285

388

39%

46%

 

Total

854

881

1,006

-

18%

 

Full-Time

133

128

130

54%

-2%

TAFEs

Fractional Full-Time

23

27

34

14%

48%

 

Casual

84

105

76

32%

-10%

 

Total

239

260

240

-

0%

 

Sector Total

57,158

58,671

59,969

-

5%

 

Table 12: Academic Staff (FTE) by Function, 2013 – 2015

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

% of total in 2015

 

% change between 2013

and 2015

Teaching and Research

27,602

27,191

27,123

48%

-2%

Teaching Only

12,547

13,919

15,115

26%

20%

Universities

Research Only

12,524

12,776

12,880

23%

3%

Other

1,796

2,110

1,643

3%

-9%

Total

54,468

55,996

56,761

-

4%

Teaching and Research

83

162

178

9%

114%

Teaching Only

1,405

1,292

1,662

85%

18%

For-Profit

Research Only

11

7

10

1%

-9%

Other

98

74

112

5%

14%

Total

1,597

1,535

1,962

-

23%

Teaching and Research

175

214

224

22%

28%

Teaching Only

591

590

693

69%

17%

Not-for-Profit

Research Only

5

7

6

1%

20%

Other

83

71

82

8%

-1%

Total

854

881

1,006

-

18%

Teaching and Research

65

69

66

28%

2%

Teaching Only

166

184

165

69%

-1%

TAFEs

Research Only

<5

<5

<5

-

-

Other

7

7

9

4%

29%

Total

239

260

240

-

0%

Sector Total

57,158

58,671

59,969

-

5%

Financial profile[31] [32]

Figure 10: Revenue Source by Provider Type

Figure 10:  Revenue Source by Provider Type

Sector highlights

Universities

Universities generated the most revenue of any group of providers in the sector. Key revenue sources for universities were government grants and programs, domestic students and international students.

TAFE

TAFE providers generated the majority of their revenue from government grants and programs and non-higher education activities.

For-Profit

Revenue generated by For-Profit providers was more diversified with international higher education, domestic higher education and non-higher education activities (such as VET) accounting for the key revenue sources.

Not-for-Profit

Not-for-Profit providers are heavily reliant on government grants and revenue from other sources such as donations and commercial activities.

 

Figure 11: Key revenue sources, Universities

Figure 11:  Key revenue sources, Universities

 

Table 13: Key revenue sources, Universities, 2014 – 2016

 

2014 ($’M)

2015 ($’M)

2016 ($’M)

%

Change 2014 to

2015

%

Change 2015 to

2016

Government grants and programs (including Commonwealth Grant Scheme, Commonwealth research grants, state and territory government grants)

11,332.9

11,588.8

11,824.5

2.3%

2.0%

Higher education domestic students (including FEE-HELP, HECS-HELP, full-fee paying student revenue)

6,400.4

6,844.1

7,140.9

6.9%

4.3%

Higher education international students

4,341.1

4,747.7

5,336.5

9.4%

12.4%

Non-higher education (including VET, ELiCOS, non-award)

231.1

306.3

355.0

32.6%

15.9%

Other sources (including donations, HE third-party delivery, commercial activities)

3,899.7

4,050.1

4,067.5

3.9%

0.4%

Total

26,205.1

27,537.0

28,724.3

5.1%

4.3%

Revenue generated by universities increased by 9.6% from 2014 to 2016.

Government grants and programs continue to account for the majority of university funding at 41%, while domestic student contributions accounted for 25% of revenue.

International student revenue was the largest source of revenue growth from 2014 to 2016, growing by $995 million.

 

Figure 12: Key revenue sources, TAFE

Figure 12:  Key revenue sources, TAFE

 

Table 14: Key revenue sources, TAFE, 2014 – 2016

 

2014 ($’M)

2015 ($’M)

2016 ($’M)

%

Change 2014 to

2015

%

Change 2015 to

2016

Government grants and programs (including Commonwealth Grant Scheme, Commonwealth research grants, state and territory government grants)

2,437.5

2,199.1

1,796.9

-9.8%

-18.3%

Higher education domestic students (including FEE-HELP, HECS-HELP, full-fee paying student revenue)

32.5

36.3

45.6

11.7%

25.7%

Higher education international students

17.9

21.7

21.4

21.1%

-1.6%

Non-higher education (including VET, ELiCOS, non-award)

1,008.8

1,215.6

1,154.8

20.5%

-5.0%

Other sources (including donations, HE third-party delivery, commercial activities)

246.6

190.3

230.8

-22.8%

21.3%

Total

3,743.3

3,663.1

3,249.5

-2.1%

-11.3%

The decline in total revenue generated by TAFEs reflects the lower number of TAFEs in 2016 (9) compared with 2014 (11).

TAFEs continue to rely heavily on government grants and non-higher education activities.

Higher education revenue from all sources (Domestic and International) was the fastest growing source of revenue for TAFEs. Growing by 33% from 2014 to 2016.

 

Figure 13: Key revenue sources, For-Profit

Figure 13:  Key revenue sources, For-Profit

 

Table 15: Key revenue sources, For-Profit, 2014 – 2016

 

2014 ($’M)

2015 ($’M)

2016 ($’M)

%

Change 2014 to

2015

%

Change 2015 to

2016

Government grants and programs (including Commonwealth Grant Scheme, Commonwealth research grants, state and territory government grants)

0.1

0.8

0.7

479.6%

-16.2%

Higher education domestic students (including FEE-HELP, HECS-HELP, full-fee paying student revenue)

346.5

399.0

435.5

15.1%

9.2%

Higher education international students

384.4

507.0

548.7

31.9%

8.2%

Non-higher education (including VET, ELiCOS, non-award)

280.7

525.0

476.8

87.0%

-9.2%

Other sources (including donations, HE third-party delivery, commercial activities)

73.5

79.7

104.8

8.5%

31.4%

Total

1,085.2

1,511.5

1,566.5

39.3%

3.6%

For-Profit providers experienced the fastest revenue growth of any provider group from 2014 to 2016 (44.4%).

Revenue sources have been diversified across international higher education students, domestic students and non-higher education activities such as VET.

Revenue generated from international students has been the largest source of revenue for For-Profit providers.

 

Figure 14: Key revenue sources, Not-for-Profit

Figure 14:  Key revenue sources, Not-for-Profit

 

Table 16: Key revenue sources, Not-for-Profit, 2014 – 2016

 

2014 ($’M)

2015 ($’M)

2016 ($’M)

%

Change 2014 to

2015

%

Change 2015 to

2016

Government grants and programs (including Commonwealth Grant Scheme, Commonwealth research grants, state and territory government grants)

750.2

799.2

821.8

6.5%

2.8%

Higher education domestic students (including FEE-HELP, HECS-HELP, full-fee paying student revenue)

181.2

205.4

171.3

13.4%

-16.6%

Higher education international students

100.8

148.3

179.0

47.1%

20.7%

Non-higher education (including VET, ELiCOS, non-award)

53.8

63.5

111.0

18.1%

74.8%

Other sources (including donations, HE third-party delivery, commercial activities)

275.2

350.6

458.8

27.4%

30.9%

Total

1,361.2

1,567.0

1,741.9

15.1%

11.2%

Government grants continue to account for approximately half the revenue generated by Not-for-Profit providers.

Other revenue sources such as donations and commercial activities account for much of the growth in revenue recorded by Not-for-Profit providers.

Explanatory notes

TEQSA works closely with the Department of Education and Training to access data within the Department’s existing collections in order to minimise the reporting burden on providers. In 2016, TEQSA and the Department worked together to streamline the reporting of student, staff and financial PIR information to the Department through its HEIMS and HITS. TEQSA has reduced its annual reporting requirements under the PIR since 2012 and is continuing to work with the Department and other stakeholders to further reduce this burden while maintaining its capacity to effectively assure standards under a risk-based approach. Pending developments to the main national collections, TEQSA intends to share further information in the future and will continue to enhance content that is released, particularly as more complete time-series information across providers becomes available through the PIR. TEQSA is also working with stakeholders to share disaggregated PIR data and analysis to support the sector’s benchmarking and quality improvement activities.

Further information about TEQSA’s PIR.

Legislation

As the national quality assurance and regulatory agency, a key function of TEQSA is to disseminate information about higher education providers and their awards. This function is specified in section 134 (1)(e) of the TEQSA Act, which notes that TEQSA may collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate information relating to higher education providers, regulated higher education awards and for quality assurance practice and improvement in higher education.

Provider exclusions and inclusions

A small number of providers were not required to submit student, academic staff and/or finance data to the TEQSA PIR for reasons such as: the provider was either recently registered as a higher education provider (and did not yet have students and/or academic staff), in the process of merging with another entity (and did not have any students enrolled), in the final stages of teaching out courses (and withdrawing registration), or had its registration cancelled by TEQSA at the time of collecting 2015 data.

A small number of providers’ academic staffing data is not included in the report as these staff deliver courses through third party arrangements (except for the University of Divinity, which reports third party staff data under HEIMS). Staffing data where academic status was classified as ‘unknown’ is also not included.

Provider categories

Student, staff and finance data is presented in the broad categories ‘Universities’, ‘Non-University For-Profit’ (For-Profits), ‘Non-University Not-for-Profit’ (Not-for-Profits) and ‘Technical and Further Education’ (TAFEs).

Rounding

In this report, data has sometimes been rounded. Rounded figures and unrounded figures should not be assumed to be accurate to the last digit shown. Where figures have been rounded, discrepancies may occur between sums of component items and totals.

Sources

This report has been prepared from the following sources:

  • TEQSA's National Register
  • TEQSA's Provider Information Request
  • Higher Education Information Management System (HEIMS), Department of Education and Training
  • HELP IT System (HITS), Department of Education and Training
  • Finance Publication, Department of Education and Training.

The below provides further information on the sources for student, staff and finance data, by provider category.

Student data:

  • 'Universities' data is sourced from the Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training. If classifying using the HESA, this includes Table A, B, C providers.
  • ‘NUHEPs For-Profit’ and ‘NUHEPs Not-for-Profit’ data is sourced from the Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training and from the TEQSA PIR.
  • ‘TAFE’ data is sourced from the Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training.

Staff data:

  • ‘Universities’ data is sourced from the Higher Education Statistics Collection, the Department of Education and Training and TEQSA’s PIR collection. If classifying using the HESA, Table A and B providers submit staff data to the Department of Education and Training, and Table C providers submit staff data to TEQSA.
  • ‘NUHEPs For-Profit’ and ‘NUHEPs Not-for-Profit’ staff data is sourced from TEQSA under its annual PIR collection, apart from data for two providers (Avondale College and Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education), which are sourced from the Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training.
  • ‘TAFEs’ staff data is sourced from TEQSA under its annual PIR collection.

Finance data:

  • Data in TEQSA’s 2016 collection year was sourced from the Department of Education and Training. Prior to 2016, financial data was sourced from TEQSA PIR collection and Department of Education and Training collections.

Timelines

Information reported is the latest available nationally:

  • Provider data relates to providers registered with TEQSA in 2015
  • Student data relates to 2015. Where trend data is available, data relates to 2013 and 2014
  • Academic Staff data relates to 2015
  • Financial year relates to a provider’s most recently available reporting year as at the time of the 2016 collection. The relevant reporting years in the collection include those ended 31 December 2015 to 30 June 2016.

Variations in Student Headcount Data

On occasion, for headcount data, the PIR headline figure may vary slightly from the raw headcount due to:

  • coding of additional student attributes in the data set
  • students that may transfer citizenship categories throughout the year; or
  • students that may be counted in multiple Broad Fields of Education.

Glossary

The data definitions and scope for student, staff and finance data used in TEQSA’s PIR have been guided by the data definitions, structures and scope established by the Department of Education and Training. For TEQSA’s purposes, some definitions have been adjusted to provide flexibility in reporting that takes into account that the PIR extends to all private higher education providers.

A glossary of data elements is available from the Department of Education and Training’s HEIMS website.

PIR definitions and elements.

Academic Staff

The classification of staff as academic is used to identify members of staff who are:

  1. People for whom salaries are the subject of determinations which are made by the Industrial Relations Department or which are made by the Remuneration Tribunal in respect of “academic and related staff”, and including Vice-Chancellors, Deputy Vice-Chancellors, Principals and Deputy Principals.
  2. People of the type referred to in Section 12A(1) of the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973 (namely those appointed wholly or principally to undertake a teaching only function or a research only function or a teaching-and-research function in a higher education provider, or those appointed by a higher education provider to be responsible for such people), and who are funded through the National Health and Medical Research Council or other bodies.
  3. People employed on a contract basis to perform the function of teaching-only, research-only or teaching-and-research, or an “other” function, where the staff member is involved in the academic delivery of the courses, even though their remuneration is not subject to the determination of the Industrial Relations Department or the Remuneration Tribunal. If a member of staff is not one of the three types referred to above, they are not classified as having an academic classification.

Australian Qualification Framework (AQF)

The AQF is the national policy for regulated qualifications in Australian education and training.

Course levels in this report are defined according to the AQF.

Further information on the AQF.

Broad Field of Education (BFoE)

Fields of Education in this report are based on the Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2011. It is a classification of courses, specialisations and units of study with the same or similar vocational emphasis or principal subject matter of the course, specialisation and unit of study.

Further information on ASCED is available on the ABS website.

Commonwealth Grant Scheme

The Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) is where the Australian Government subsidises tuition costs for higher education students across a wide range of discipline areas and qualification levels.

Since the beginning of 2012, public universities have been able to decide how many domestic students they enrol in bachelor level courses (excluding medicine) and receive funding for these ‘Commonwealth supported places’ (CSPs).

Further information on the CGS.

Commonwealth Supported Place

A Commonwealth supported place (CSP) is a subsidised higher education enrolment. CSPs are available at all public universities (and at a handful of private higher education providers in national priority areas like nursing and education).

The Australian Government subsidises a CSP by paying part of the fees for the place directly to the university. The subsidy amount is not a loan and students do not have to pay the subsidy amount back. However, students are also required to contribute towards their study and they pay the remainder of the fee known as the ‘student contribution amount’ for each unit they are enrolled in. Universities set their own student contribution amounts (within limits set by the Australian Government).

CSPs are only available to domestic students and most undergraduate students studying at university are enrolled in a CSP. There is no cap to the amount of study a student can undertake in a CSP. A student enrolled in a CSP is referred to as a Commonwealth supported student.

Further information on CSPs.

Domestic Student

A student who is one of the following:

  • an Australian citizen (including Australian citizens with dual citizenship)
  • a New Zealand citizen or a diplomatic or consular representative of New Zealand, a member of the staff of such a representative or the spouse or dependent relative of such a representative, excluding those with Australian citizenship (Note: includes any such persons who have Permanent Resident status)
  • a permanent humanitarian visa holder, or
  • a holder of a permanent visa other than a permanent humanitarian visa.

Dual Sector Provider

Within the tertiary education sector, an institution that offers both vocational (skills-based) and higher (academic-based) education.

Equivalent Full-Time Student Load (EFTSL)

EFTSL is a measure of the study load for a year of a student undertaking a course of study on a fulltime basis. Total EFTSL for a full-time student in a course in a given year will typically be 1.0. In some cases, a student may be undertaking a number of units in a given year above a full-time load. In these cases, the EFTSL may be above 1.0.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is an Australian Government loan program to help eligible fee-paying students to pay their tuition fees.

Further information on FEE-HELP

Full-Time Equivalence (FTE)

FTE is a measure of the resources for a staff member in respect of their current duties, expressed as a proportion of a typical full-time staff member. A member of staff who has, at the determined reference date, a full-time work contract in respect of their current duties, has a full-time equivalence of 1.00 at the reference date (FTE-RD). The FTE-RD for a member of staff who at the reference date has a fractional full-time (i.e. part-time) work contract in respect of their current duties, is less than 1.00. The fraction represents the ratio between the number of agreed normal work hours for that person and the number of normal work hours that would be required of a member of staff having the same classification type and level as that person, but with a full-time work contract.

HECS-HELP

HECS HELP is a loan scheme for eligible students enrolled in Commonwealth supported places to pay their student contribution amounts.

Further information on HECS-HELP.

Mode of Attendance

The classification of the manner in which a student is undertaking a unit of study.

  • Internal: a unit of study at an onshore or offshore campus (includes classroom based)
  • External: a unit of study at an onshore or offshore campus (includes electronic-based, online and by correspondence).
  • Flexible: a unit of study is undertaken partially on an internal mode of attendance and partially on an external mode of attendance.

Offshore Student EFTSL

The proportion of EFTSL attributable to students undertaking a program of study partially or wholly at an offshore campus of a registered Australian higher education provider.

Onshore Student EFTSL

The proportion of EFTSL attributable to students undertaking a program of study conducted in Australia by a registered Australian higher education provider.

Overseas Student

Any student who is not classified under the citizenship categories as a domestic student (see ‘Domestic Student’ definition), primarily international students studying in Australia or offshore, undertaking an Australian award.

Self-Accrediting Authority

A higher education provider may be authorised to self-accredit a course of study, or courses of study, at one or more higher education award levels, and in one or more broad fields of study or discipline areas.

Further information on self-accrediting authority.

 

 

 

 

[1] Source: TEQSA National Register; 2016 PIR; Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training. See Explanatory Notes for information on data sources.

[2] State in which provider is registered.

[3] See Glossary for definition of ‘self-accrediting authority’.

[4] These figures relate to separately registered higher education providers. Figures are not aggregated where two or more registered providers are under one corporate structure.

[5] 9 providers were not required to submit student data to the TEQSA PIR due to context such as being a recently registered higher education provider, in the process of merging with another entity, in the final stages of teaching out courses (and withdrawing registration), or ceased to be registered with TEQSA at the time of collecting 2015 data (i.e. in 2016).

[6] See Glossary for definition of ‘dual sector’.

[7] See Glossary for definition of ‘CRICOS registration’.

[8] TEQSA accredited refers to courses that TEQSA accredits as the provider does not hold the authority to self-accredit those courses.

[9] TEQSA accredited refers to courses that TEQSA accredits as the provider does not hold the authority to self-accredit those courses.

[10] Source: 2014 PIR, 2015 PIR and 2016 PIR; Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training. See Explanatory Notes for information on data sources.

[11] A small number of providers were not required to submit student data to the TEQSA PIR due to context such as: the provider was recently registered as a higher education provider; in the process of merging with another entity; in the final stages of teaching out courses (and withdrawing registration); or had its registration cancelled by TEQSA at the time of collecting 2015 data (i.e. in 2016).

[12] See Explanatory Notes for information on provider categories used in this report.

[13] Students coded as in the 2016 PIR as studying units ‘Partially Offshore’ have been included in the ‘Offshore’ category.

[14] See Glossary for definitions of ‘Onshore’ and ‘Offshore’.

[15] See Glossary for definitions of ‘Domestic’ and ‘Overseas’.

[16] Excludes student citizenship classified as ‘unknown’ or ‘unspecified’.

[17] Data derived from the broad field of education of the course, rather than the broad field of education of the unit studied.

[18] Excludes non-award and enabling courses.

[19] ‘Undergraduate’ includes Bachelor Honours students.

[20] ‘Other’ refers to a higher education providers’ non-award and enabling courses.

[21] Data derived from the broad field of education of the course, rather than the broad field of education of the unit studied.

[22] Excludes non-award and enabling courses.

[23] Excludes students with basis of admission classified as ‘Professional qualification’ and ‘unspecified’.

[24] See Glossary for definition of ‘mode of attendance’.

[25] Excludes students with mode of attendance not specified.

[26] Total may vary from the sum of components due to coding of additional student attributes (where the student may be counted more than once).

[27] Source: 2014 PIR, 2015 PIR and 2016 PIR; Higher Education Statistics Collection, Department of Education and Training. See Explanatory Notes for information on data sources.

[28] 165 providers reported 2015 academic staff data.

[29] Excludes staff with duties unspecified or duties classified as ‘unknown’. Apart from the University of Divinity, data also excludes academic staff that teach higher education courses through a third party arrangement.

[30] See Explanatory Notes for information on provider categories used in this report.

[31] Data in TEQSA’s 2016 collection year was sourced from the Department of Education and Training. Prior to 2016, financial data was sourced from TEQSA PIR collection and Department of Education and Training collections.

[32] Financial year relates to a provider’s most recently available reporting year as at the time of the 2016 collection. The relevant reporting years in the collection include those ended 31 December 2015 to 30 June 2016.